Osteoporosis Symptoms – What to Know About The Silent Epidemic

Osteoporosis symptoms do not occur when you first develop the disease.  For this reason, it is called the “silent epidemic.”  It sneaks up on you until one day you have a fracture or broken bone.  But over time, you will begin to see various osteoporosis symptoms.  These include:   Back pain Slumped posture Bone fracture and breaks Compression fractures   Eight million American women and 2 million American men have the condition.  As many as 50 percent of women will develop the disease in their lifetimes.  Caucasians and Asians are more likely to develop Osteoporosis than people of other races, but it strikes everyone.  Post-menopausal women are the ones most at risk.   Osteoporosis is caused when bone mass decreases.  This results in the bones to be more susceptible to fracture. Bone is constantly being broken down and reabsorbed by cells which are osteoclasts, and then rebuilt by other cells...
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Osteoporosis Medicine – The Types Of Treatments For The Condition

Osteoporosis medicine is prescribed when you come down with the disease.  Osteoporosis is a disease which makes your bones brittle and susceptible to fractures and breaks.  It is a serious condition.  20 percent of people who suffer from a spinal break due to osteoporosis will die within a year.  That is why you want to take your osteoporosis medicine.   Post-menopausal white and Asian women are the groups most at risk for the condition.  8 million women suffer from osteoporosis and 2 million men do.  It is estimated that 50 percent of women will come down with the disease at some point in their lives.   Osteoporosis has no cure but it can be treated.  Osteoporosis medicine includes:   Actinol – Actinol is a bisphosphonate marketed by Aventis. Actinol is a prescription medication that prevents and treats postmenopausal osteoporosis. It is the only oral monthly osteoporosis treatment that has been...
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Osteoporosis Guidelines – What Your Doctor Should Be Doing

Osteoporosis guidelines for testing are important because this is a “silent” disease.  That is, you wouldn’t know you had it until you break a bone.  While bone density tests allow doctors to detect it, there are no symptoms short of a broken bone or sharp pain.  That’s why there are osteoporosis guidelines.   These osteoporosis guidelines are for doctors.  However, if you are a patient, knowing what your doctor is supposed to do will help you know whether your physician is doing everything he or she can do to keep you from potentially deathly falls caused by osteoporosis.   Osteoporosis guidelines are for physicians who are advising patients 50 years of age or older, in particular post-menopausal women.  They are supposed to advise their patients about the risk for osteoporosis and recommend a bone density test, if appropriate.  In addition, they should evaluate patients for secondary causes of the disease....
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Osteoporosis Exercises to Keep You Limber

If you are an older adult, you should begin doing osteoporosis exercises.  Many people with low bone density worry that doing any exercise might lead to a fracture.  But, the reality is that using your muscles can actually help you protect your bones.  Here are some osteoporosis exercises that can help you prevent broken bones.   People who have always been physically active are less likely to have bone problems later in life.  However, that doesn’t mean that people who were couch potatoes in middle age shouldn’t take up osteoporosis exercises when the condition first manifests itself.   In women, after menopause, the pace of bone loss increases.  At that point, starting an exercise program is critical.  It will increase your muscle strength, improve your balance and help you avoid falls — and it may keep your bones from getting weaker.  Other benefits of osteoporosis exercises include increasing your ability...
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Osteoporosis Effects on The Body

Osteoporosis effects the body by causing the bones to degenerate and lose mass.  8 million women and 2 million men in America are afflicted with the disease and at least half of all women will de osteoporosis effects in their lifetimes.  There is no cure for osteoporosis, but there are treatments which will lessen osteoporosis’ effects.   Although there are currently not any cures for osteoporosis, several treatments exist that can help you to increase your bone density and prevent potential fractures. If you currently suffer from osteoporosis or are at risk for osteoporosis, you should know what the choices you have are so that you can select the correct treatment to reduce the osteoporosis effects.   Osteoporosis is when your bones lose a percentage of their mineral density. It leads to serious fractures, including those in the wrist, hip and spine. The fractures from osteoporosis can be painful and...
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Osteoporosis – Bone Health for This Condition

With osteoporosis, bones are brittle and often fracture or break.  There are no symptoms prior to the osteoporosis bones’ shattering and the disease can only be detected through tests in your doctor’s office.  You won’t automatically know your bones are getting thinner.   White and Asian women past menopause are most susceptible to the disease, but people of any age, race or gender can get it.  8 million American women and 2 million American men have the condition.  It is estimated that 50 percent of American women will experience Osteoporosis in their lifetime.  If you have osteoporosis, bone’s health is of paramount concern.   Spinal fractures are probably the most significant concern as 20 percent of people who develop this osteoporosis bones break will die within a year.  Other areas commonly affected are the hip and wrist.  Hip fractures limit mobility and often result in the sufferer having to move...
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Osteoporosis Causes the Bones in The Body to Become Brittle

Osteoporosis causes the bones of the body to become brittle.  In turn, they break easily.  It is characterized by low bone mass and loss of bone tissue that may lead to weak and fragile bones. Those with osteoporosis, have an increased risk for fractured and broken bones, particularly in the hip, spine, and wrist.   Once thought to be a condition of old women, the osteoporosis causes actually begin much earlier in life.  Peak bone density occurs at age 25.  So, it is important to build strong bones at a young age so that they will remain strong later in life.  Having adequate calcium is one of the ways people build strong bones.   10 million Americans already have osteoporosis and 18 million more have low bone mass that makes them susceptible to the disease.  4 in 5 people with osteoporosis are women.  1 in 2 women and 1 in...
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Managing Chronic Pain in Osteoporosis

The pain associated with osteoporosis usually comes from painful fractures that take a couple of months to heal. Typically, the pain slowly goes away as the fracture heals over time. The typical fractures associated with osteoporosis heal over a period of three months. Any pain that continues after the fracture has healed is classified as chronic pain. Causes of Chronic Pain One of the primary causes of chronic pain in osteoarthritis is vertebral fractures. While some people experience very little, or no pain from vertebra fractures, other people have intense pain accompanied by severe muscle spasms that continue to develop years after the fracture has completely healed. Pain is your body’s way of telling you that something is injured, or you are putting too much force on a part of your body that cannot handle it. When bones break, the surrounding nerves immediately send pain signals up the spinal cord...
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Forteo Osteoporosis Treatment – The Pros And Cons

There are benefits and risks of Forteo.  Osteoporosis patients should weigh the pros and cons before deciding to take the medication.  It is one of the newest cures for the disease, and it has its backers and detractors.  Forteo Osteoporosis cures can be appropriate for some people under some circumstances.   There are two main objections to Forteo osteoporosis medication.  The first is that it might cause a rare form of cancer known as osteosarcoma.  The other is that it is quite expensive.   Forteo Osteoporosis medicine has been on the market for four years.  It stimulates the cells that build bone to make bones larger and harder.  Older medicines like bisphosphonates, or medications like Boniva, Actonel, or Fosamax, kill the cells that degrade bone to slow bone loss.  Forteo increases bone mineral density in the spine to a much greater degree in a shorter period of time than bisphosphonates,...
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Bone Density Tests – Risk Detectors for Osteoporosis

Bone density tests allow you to know whether you are at risk of developing osteoporosis before anything bad begins to happen.  Years ago, the only time osteoporosis could be detected was after you broke a bone. By then, however, your bones might already be quite weak.  Today bone density tests, which are also called densitometry or DEXA scans, can determine if you have osteoporosis or are at risk of osteoporosis before you break any bones.   Bone density tests use special X-rays to measure the grams of calcium and other bone minerals packed into a given segment of bone.  It is a pretty accurate risk predictor. The results from bone density tests can let you know how you compare as far as bone mass with other people of your age, gender, and other similar characteristics.   When your mineral content is high, your bones are dense. Dense bones are strong...
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